Guam quickly turned into a giant supply base for the proposed invasion of Japan.  These photos show how many ships were anchored or moored here.   Fall, 1944. The breakwater had only been partially built by the Seabees.  Also note the entrance to the Cabras channel in the lower right.  There was no commercial port at the time, only reef flats.

For the story and video of who built the Glas Breakwater go here.

 

Ships tied up on the piers at Sumay. They were built by the Seabees in 1944-45 to have access to the supply base warehouses.

 

Agat Bay showing the invasion landing craft and support ships. Notice that there is no foilage anywhere near the beaches due to the pre invasion bombardments.

Photo taken in August, 1945. The ships at the bottom are tied to the barges that still exist along the las breakwater.   The "American tanker" was already sunk.  Orote airfield is in the upper portion of the photo

 

Late summer, 1944.  Smoke can still be seen in the upper left from fires burning at the end of the Orote field runway.   At times there were over 70 ships moored in the harbor.

 

Orote runway on fire during the pre-invasion bombing.

 

Agat Bay showing the invasion landing craft and support ships. Notice that there is no foilage anywhere near the beaches due to the pre invasion bombardments.

 

Japanese zero on the beach in Agat at the cemetery. It's believed that this is the same plane that's now called the deep zero. You can also see troops walking into the beach in the upper right.